SportTracks Blog


Post author Anna Cleaver 

The kick in swimming – is it necessary for triathlon? What is its function? How much focus should we put on it in training and how can we improve it?

Many triathletes assume the kick is not an important part of their swim stroke. Common reasons given are: a wetsuit makes the kick less important, we are not sprinters, and we want to save our legs for the bike and run.

These are in part valid points, however the kick is still a crucial part to the athlete's stroke and should be incorporated into training. Below I address each of these concerns, and also elaborate on how to improve your kick for triathlon swimming.

1. Does a wetsuit make the kick unnecessary?

A wetsuit absolutely assists in body position. However, a poor kick (or no kick) will bring down the hip position and may cause the body to sway from side to side unnecessarily. A smooth continuous kick will actually assist in elevating the body in the water, wetsuit or no wetsuit. To highlight an extreme example, strapping your feet together would cause your legs to sink, making the swim stroke that much harder.

For today’s post, we’re going back to basics and addressing one of the key components of using SportTracks: adding a workout. This post will hopefully lend some direction to those of you starting out with us and provide refresher to our longtime users. Read on and get tracking.

First Up: Bulk Device Import

Completing a bulk device import will be quicker and easier than adding workouts one by one. Note that this only works with a Garmin watch. For other devices you will need to use the File Import option described further down.

  1. Log in to your SportTracks.mobi account.
     
  2.  Connect your device. 
     
  3. Mouse over the Add workout tab in the top right corner and click the second option, Device import. 

Gearing Series Addendum

Thursday, July 31, 2014
by matt shinavar

Quick Navigation:
Road Cycling
Time Trialing and Triathlon
Cyclocross
Conclusion

This is my final post in my blog series on bike gearing. Click on the links provided to access Part 1 or Part 2. Thus far, we’ve discussed very specific examples for gearing – specifically a single-ring gear choice for me on my carbon hard tail to replace my existing 2x10 gearing setup.  That represents the interests of a very small – albeit currently quite hot – market segment.  

Let’s look at a couple other subsets of riding and different gear ratios associated with each subset.  Again, we’ll be using the gear calculators found here 


Winner Vicenzo Nibali pictured with his biggest competitor this race (no one).

If you’ve been on the blog at all in the past month, it's pretty clear we've followed this year’s Tour de France pretty closely. The race ended this past Sunday with Italian cyclist Vicenzo Nibali claiming the coveted maillot jaune.

In case you missed the last week of racing, here are the highlights from Stage 13 on. For coverage of this year’s Stages 1-12, check out our recap Getting Caught Up to Speed.

Stage 13

Nibali extends his overall lead to an impressive three minutes and 39 seconds in this climbing stage, taking over the polka dot jersey while he’s at it.

Quick Navigation:

This article is the second in a series on bicycle gearing. If you missed out on the first article, it’s highly recommended the series be read in order since this article will pick up in the middle of the discussion from last time; part one may be found here.

I'm reposting the bike diagram found in Part 1. The terms can be confusing and I'm hoping this will help put the post in context.

Last time I promised we would discuss chain ring sizing and close the loop on connecting the physics of gears with the practical application of gearing to a bicycle.

 

Paris - Champs-Élysées

We at SportTracks are thrilled to announce a new series of art to celebrate the Tour de France.  We will be releasing a new piece every week to showcase a different section of this tour.

Paris - Champs-Élysées is the last of the four-part series, covering the celebration surround the last ride before crossing the finish line, ending the 21-stage race.

The artist describes the piece:
 

For the final piece, I tried to pull a number of elements together, echoing the previous pieces: the crowds, cyclists, scenery and a bit of motion. I was hoping to give a feeling closeness by placing the viewer low, without being overwhelming, or feeling claustrophobic. I wanted to show off a bit of the city, too, and hopefully convey the excitement of the final stretch.
 

Quick Navigation:

They say power is nothing without control.  While I agree with that statement wholeheartedly, sometimes the trouble is effectively utilizing the power.

This article is the first in a discussion on gearing, with an emphasis on choosing the correct gearing for a specific riding application.  (See Part 2 here.)

Just like a time trial bike isn’t the most efficient bike for a training ride with a lot of climbing – the cassette and chainrings on a time trial bike would be out of place on a climbing bike– maybe you have the legs that it just doesn’t matter.  These articles will provide the information required to choose appropriate gearing for a specific application.

 

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